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Hiring Minors in the Summer: New Hampshire & Florida

Summer is coming and so are young people looking for summer employment. The rules in New Hampshire are stricter than those in the Federal Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and include the following:

  1. No one under the age of 16 can be employed without getting a New Hampshire Youth Employment Certificate, signed by a parent or legal guardian, unless they are employed by a parent, grandparent or guardian or at work defined as casual or farm labor.
  2. In any case, they cannot work before 7 a.m. or after 9 p.m. or for more than 48 hours a week during vacations.
  3. No one under the age of 12 can be employed (with or without a work permit) unless they are employed by a parent, grandparent or guardian or at work defined as casual or farm labor.
  4. Minors age 16-17 cannot work more than 6 days per week, or more than 30 hours during a school calendar weeks.

Florida law more closely follows the Federal Labor Standards Act and has fewer restrictions on minors 16-17 in some instances. For example, Florida has no restrictions on the hours of work when school is not in session, but still does restrict the number of days to no more than 6 consecutive days in a week.

The laws prohibiting child labor in hazardous jobs are strict on both the federal and state level.  There are 17 prohibited occupations for ALL minors under 18; none can be hired in any way in these occupations.  Additionally, whenever minors have to operate equipment, they should be very well trained to prevent injury and possible fines or lawsuits.

In fact, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommends that supervisors and experienced workers develop an injury and illness prevention program. That program would benefit everyone in the company, and HR Compliance 101 can help you set it up. Contact us now before both the summer and the young workers arrive.

 

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